Manhattan Neighborhoods

TOP20C

Battery Park City
Built on ninety-two acres of landfill, this waterfront neighborhood is bounded to the north by Chambers Street, to the east by West Street, to the south by Pier A and to the west by the Hudson River. The initial plan was completed in 1988. Click here for more.

Carnegie Hill
Bounded to the north by 96th Street, to the east by Third Avenue, to the south by 86th Street and to the west by Fifth Avenue. When Andrew Carnegie built his neo-Georgian mansion at 91st Street & Fifth Avenue, he sold nearby lots to wealthy friends like Otto H. Kahn and John Henry Hammond.

Chelsea
Within the boundaries of 14th Street to the south, the Hudson River to the west, 30th Street to the north and Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) to the east.


Chinatown
Bounded to the north by Kenmare and Delancey Streets, to the east by Allen Street, to the south by East and Worth Streets and to the west by Broadway. By the 1980s,Chinatown expanded beyond its traditional boundaries to include much of Little Italy, and parts of the Lower East Side. Mott Street is considered the Main Street of Chinatown.

Clinton
Bounded to the north by 59th Street, to the east by Eighth Avenue, to the south by 42nd Street, and to the west by the Hudson River. It occupies most of the area formerly known as Hell’s Kitchen.

Diamond District
The center of the retail and wholesale diamond trade in New York City. West 47th Street between Fifth Avenue and Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue). Generally credited with handling 80% of all diamonds entering the United States.

East Village
Bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the west, the East River to the east, and Houston Street to the south. St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery stands on land that was once the site of Peter Stuyvesant’s family chapel.

Garment District
Section of Manhattan dominated by the garment industry, Mostly in the 30s between Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), and Eighth Avenue. Once the world’s largest concentration of apparel manufacturers, the sidestreets are crowded with trucks delivering material and loading racks of finished garments.

Gramercy Park
Bounded to the north by 23rd Street, to the east by Third Avenue, to the south 18th Street, and to the west by Park Avenue South. The park remains private and looks the way it did in the early nineteenth century. Well known residents have included Theodore Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Stanford White, Eugene O’Neill, O. Henry, and Nathanael West.

Greenwich Village
Bounded to the north by 14th Street, to the east by Fourth Avenue and the Bowery, to the west by the Hudson River and to the south by Houston Street.

Hamilton Heights Historic District
Often considered part of Harlem, this neighborhood is named for Alexander Hamilton, who spent the last years of his life at his country home, now called Hamilton Grange. The campus of City College of New York is along Convent Avenue between 132nd and 140th Streets.

Harlem
Bounded to the north by the Harlem River, to the east by Fifth Avenue, to the south by 110th Street (Central Park North), and to the west by Morningside and St. Nicholas Avenues. It includes areas known as Bradhurst, Striver’s Row, Manhattanville, Hamilton Heights, and Sugar Hill.

Hell’s Kitchen
See Clinton.

Little Italy
Bounded to the north by Houston Street, to the east by Mulberry Street, to the south by Canal Street, and to the west by Broadway. This neighborhood remains well-known for its restaurants and bakeries.

Lower East Side
Bounded to the north by 14th Street, to the east by the East River, to the south by Fulton and Franklin Streets, and the west by Pearl Street and Broadway. It includes areas known as the East Village, Chinatown, Little Italy, Tompkins Square, Astor Place, and Knickerbocker Village The Five Points (featured in the movie “Gangs of New York”) was located at the intersection of Baxter, Worth, and Park Streets (close to Foley Square). By the 1920s it became one of the largest Jewish enclaves in America. Following the Second World War, it became the first racially integrated section of the city when thousands of blacks, and Puerto Ricans moved there.

Morningside Heights
Bounded to the north by 125th Street, to the east by Morningside Park, to the south by 110th Street, and to the west by the Hudson River. Columbia University dominates the neighborhood, which also includes Barnard College, Riverside Church, Union Theological Seminary, the Jewish Theological Seminary, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

Murray Hill
Bounded to the north by 40th Street, to the east by Third Avenue, to the south by 34th Street, and to the west by Madison Avenue. Landmarks include the Pierpont Morgan Library and townhouses built in the early twentieth century.

SoHo
Bounded on the north by Houston Street, to the east by Crosby Street, to the south by Canal Street, and to the west by Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas). The name stands for “South of Houston”). After this twenty-six block area of cast-iron buildings was designated a Historic District by the New York City Landmarks Commission in 1973, it was revitalized with fashionable boutiques, galleries, restaurants and shops. It remains one of the most diverse and vibrant neighborhoods in the city.

South Street Seaport
Once the center of the port district, it was reborn as a tourist attraction featuring two restored blocks of historic buildings, a revitalized Fulton Market, a three-story shopping mall called Pier 17, and a Seaport Museum with one of the world’s largest collections of historic ships and ship models. Click here for more.

TriBeCa
Stands for “Triangle Below Canal.” Bounded to the north by Canal Street, to the east by Broadway, to the south by Barclay Street, and to the west by the Hudson River.

Tudor City
Apartment and hotel complex. East of Second Avenue between 40th and 43rd Streets, adjacent to the United Nations buildings on First Avenue.

Upper East Side
Bounded to the north by 96th Street, to the east by the East River, to the south by 59th Street, and to the west by Fifth Avenue. Aslo known as the Silk Stocking District. In 1990 its zip code (10021) was the wealthiest in the nation.

Upper West Side
Bounded to the north by 125th Street, to the east by Central Park West, to the south by 59th Street, and to the west by the Hudson River.

Wall Street
Wall Street runs for less than a mile between Broadway and the East River along what was originally the northern edge of New Amsterdam. When the junction of Wall & Broad Streets became the site of the New York Stock Exchange, Wall Street became synonymous with high finance.

Yorkville
Bounded to the north by 96th Street, to the east by the East River, to the south by 72nd Street and to the west by Central Park. 86th Street, once the center of Germantown, is now lined with shops, restaurants,and pharmacies. Gracie Mansion, the official home of the Mayor of New York, is located at northern end of Carl Schurz Park (East End Avenue & 88th Street).
Battery Park City
Built on ninety-two acres of landfill, this waterfront neighborhood is bounded to the north by Chambers Street, to the east by West Street, to the south by Pier A and to the west by the Hudson River. The initial plan was completed in 1988.

 



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